1 Dourg

Latin Roots Lesson 13 Homework

Texts included with these materials are of high quality, appropriately complex, and include opportunities to apply reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills across a variety of tasks designed to grow students’ literacy skills over the course of the year. The materials reviewed do not have a formal foundational skills component and instead recommend pairing the materials with a high-quality foundational skills program. With the materials provided, foundational skills are met or partially met in various ways throughout the materials.

Criterion 1a-1f

Texts are worthy of students' time and attention: texts are of quality and are rigorous, meeting the text complexity criteria for each grade. Materials support students' advancing toward independent reading.

Core texts consider a range of student interests, are worthy of careful reading, and many are written by award winning authors. Included are a mix of informational and literary texts centered around a single theme or topic per module to facilitate the learning of the content. Each module contains a wide array of informational and literary text integrated to support knowledge acquisition on the module’s topic. The texts are at the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task. Core texts are accompanied by a rationale for purpose and placement as well as support for all learners as they grapple with complex text. The materials support students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year while engaging in a range and volume of reading. Series of texts are at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.

4/4

Indicator 1a

Anchor texts are of publishable quality and worthy of especially careful reading and consider a range of student interests.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations for central texts being of publishable quality and worthy of careful reading and considering a range of student interests.

Core Texts consider a range of topics of interest to Grade 4 students, including the heart, circulatory system, the challenges people face, the American Revolution, dealing with conflict, mythology, and Native Americans. Some of the Core Texts are award winners, and many are written by award-winning authors and are worthy of careful reading.

Examples of central texts that are worthy of careful reading include the following:

Module 1:

  • Love That Dog, Sharon Creech
  • The Circulatory Story, by Mary K. Corcoran
  • Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening, by Robert Frost (supplementary)
  • Love That Boy, by Walter Dean Myers (supplementary)

Module 2:

  • Mountains, by Seymour Simon
  • All Summer in a Day, by Ray Bradbury
  • Hatchet, by Gary Paulsen

Module 3:

  • Woods Runner, by Gary Paulsen
  • The Scarlet Stockings Spy, by Trinka Hakes Noble
  • George vs. George: The American Revolution as Seen from Both Sides, by Rosalyn Schanzer.
Module 4:
  • PushingUp the Sky: Native American Plays for Children, by Joseph Bruchac
  • Understanding Greek Myths, by Natalie Hyde
  • Walk Two Moons, by Sharon Creech

4/4

Indicator 1b

Materials reflect the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards at each grade level.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations for materials reflecting the distribution of text types and genres required by the standards.

Core texts include a mix of informational and literary texts. Each module centers on a theme that integrates many types of text and media to support the learning of the topic. The themes of the modules at this grade level are The Great Heart (including figurative and literal exploration), Extreme Settings, Conflict (including the Revolutionary War), and Myth Making. What is important to note is that there is a wide array of informational and literary text integrated throughout every module no matter the topic or theme. Additional supplementary texts are included, resulting in a wide distribution of genres and text types as required by the standards, including historical fiction, poetry, fables, non-fiction, biographies, websites, journal articles, speeches, plays, and historical accounts.

The following are examples of literature found within the instructional materials:

  • Module 1- Love That Dog, by Sharon Creech
  • Module 2- Hatchet, by Gary Paulsen
  • Module 3- The Scarlet Stockings Spy, by Trinka Hakes Noble
  • Module 4- Walk Two Moons, by Sharon Creech

The following are examples of informational text found within the instructional materials:

  • Module 1- The Circulatory Story, by Mary K. Corcoran
  • Module 2- Mountains, by Seymour Simon
  • Module 3- George vs. George: The American Revolution as Seen from Both Sides, by Rosalyn Schanzer
  • Module 4- Understanding Greek Myths, by Natalie Hyde

4/4

Indicator 1c

Texts have the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations for texts having the appropriate level of complexity for the grade according to quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, and relationship to their associated student task. Most texts are aligned to the complexity requirements outlined in the Common Core Standards, with text complexity rubrics appearing in Appendix A of the Great Minds Teacher’s Guide. All major text qualitative/quantitative information are identified in Appendix A, while supporting texts are referenced in Appendix E. Among the texts that are not within the grade-level band, a qualitative feature analysis gives additional insight as to the appropriateness of their placement in the curriculum. The texts that have a Lexile level above the grade-level band show ample support for accessing the text during the "reader and task" components.

  • Module 3, Lessons 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, and 32: Woods Runner, by Gary Paulsen (literary, 870L): This historical fiction text has a plot and theme that are easy to identify. Non-standard language is highly-supported by context.

Of the texts that are not within the grade-level band, a qualitative feature analysis gives additional insight as to the appropriateness of their placement in the curriculum. The following texts have a Lexile level above the grade-level band, yet the qualitative measure and reader and task components make the text accessible for grade 4 readers.

  • Module 2, Lessons 17-34: Hatchet by Gary Paulsen (realistic fiction, 1020L): Even though this Lexile level is above the grade-level stretch band, possible unfamiliar vocabulary is supported in context.

4/4

Indicator 1d

Materials support students' increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. (Series of texts should be at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.)

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations that materials support students’ increasing literacy skills over the course of the school year. Series of texts are at a variety of complexity levels appropriate for the grade band.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet expectations for supporting students' ability to access texts with increasing text complexity across the year. The texts, both anchor and supporting, fall within the grade-level band, and appear to provide students access to increasingly rigorous texts over the course of the school year. As seen in the quantitative and qualitative analyses of the included texts, there is clear, defined scaffolding of the texts to ensure that students are supported to access and comprehend most grade-level texts at the end of the year. While the rigor of text is appropriate in aggregate over the course of the school year, students will engage with texts at varying levels, unit to unit and quarter to quarter, in a structure that may provide support for accelerating their literacy growth.

Over the course of the school year, students will engage in appropriately rigorous texts in aggregate, but unit to unit and quarter to quarter, there is variance in how they engage with these texts. Some examples that demonstrate this include the following:

  • In Module 1 students read the biographies: Clara & Davie (690L), Clara Barton: Angel on the Battlefield (820L), and Who was Clara Barton? with a quantitative measure of 960L. At the end of the module students are expected to write an informational essay that synthesizes evidence from multiple literary and informational text to explain figurative and literal meaning of the term, great heart.
  • In Module 3 students read the informational text George vs. George: The American Revolution as Seen from Both Sides. This text is quantitatively measured as 1120L. Students also engage with the historical fiction text Woods Runner (870L) and the informational text Detested Tea (1080L) and Massacre in King Street (970L). At the end of the module, students are expected to use information from two (2) of the texts to write an opinion essay about whether the Patriots were justified in fighting for independence from Britain. The consistency of these quantitative measures, coupled with the consistency of the qualitative features of these texts, supports students' accelerating their reading abilities.

The qualitative measures of these texts are appropriate, as are the associated tasks and questions. Teachers may need to provide extra support and study to help Grade 4 students navigate these variations unit to unit. The supporting texts consistently increase in complexity across the year.

2/2

Indicator 1e

Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations for materials being accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for educational purpose and placement in the grade level. Anchor texts and series of texts connected to them are accompanied by a text complexity analysis and rationale for purpose and placement in the grade level. Text complexity rubrics appear in Appendix A of Great Minds Teacher’s Guide. All major text qualitative/quantitative information is identified in Appendix A, while supporting texts are referenced in Appendix E. This includes a description of text that provides rationale for why the text was selected.

  • Module 3:The Scarlet Stockings Spy, Trinka Hakes Noble: “The Scarlet Stockings Spy is a beautifully illustrated American Revolution tale about a brave, young Patriot named Maddy Rose. Through Maddy’s story, we experience the personal sacrifice, devotion and determination that helped the American colonies defeat the most powerful country in the world."
  • Module 4: The rationale is provided in the overview of the unit, stating, “Through the lens of a masterful contemporary novel inspired by Greek mythology, this module teaches students about the relevance of mythology and the power of stories to convey important life lessons.”

2/2

Indicator 1f

Anchor text(s), including support materials, provide opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade level reading.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations for core texts and supporting materials providing opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading to achieve grade-level reading.

Each unit includes lessons with supplementary texts of varying lengths. These texts are read independently, in groups, aloud, and silently, offering multiple opportunities for students to engage in a range and volume of reading.

  • In Module 3, Lesson 4, students are asked to, “Compare and contrast two accounts of the Boston Massacre from the article, Massacre in King Street and George vs. George: The American Revolution as Seen from Both Sides, to reveal more about the incident and about multiple perspectives.”
  • In Module 4, Lesson 25, students are tasked with listening to a reading of The Tide Rises, The Tide Falls, by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. They are encouraged to read along with the audio and later use it to compare the poem to other texts read.

Instructional materials clearly identify opportunities for students to build fluency to become independent readers at the grade level.

  • In Module 1, Lesson 3, students are tasked with reading sticky notes of others and to volunteer to read a quote out loud based on fluency homework from the night before.
  • In Module 2, Lesson 1, the teacher models fluent reading of select passages, and students engage in choral reading with the teacher.

Criterion 1g-1n

Materials provide opportunities for rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about texts to build strong literacy skills.

Materials provide opportunities for students to engage in writing, speaking, and listening work that requires them to gather evidence from texts and sources. Opportunities to ask questions and hold text-based discussions using academic vocabulary with peers and teachers about research, strategies, and ideas are present throughout the year. Questions throughout the modules build knowledge as students prepare to complete the culminating tasks. Writing tasks are varied and include longer, focused, evidence-based writing tasks.

2/2

Indicator 1g

Most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-dependent, requiring students to engage with the text directly (drawing on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the text).

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectation that most questions, tasks, and assignments are text-specific and require students to engage with the text directly and to draw on textual evidence to support both what is explicit as well as valid inferences from the texts. Questions draw the reader back into the text and support students’ literacy growth over the course of the school year. Reading and writing (and speaking and listening) are done in a cohesive learning environment. Students read and reread to write and discuss. The materials provide opportunities for evidence-based discussions and writing. Examples of student directions include but are not limited to, “Look closely”, “Provide details”, “Compare”, “Write a summary”, “What do you notice?” and, “Write an introduction.”

Below are examples of text-dependent/specific questions included in each module:

  • Module 1, Lesson 9, “Looking closely at pages 6 and 7, how do the illustrations help the reader understand the hard science? Provide details from the book to support your answer.”
  • Module 2, Lesson 19, “What challenges is Brian already faced with after the crash?"
  • Module 3, Lesson 13, “How does this text impact your understanding of the Loyalists’ and/or Patriots’ perspectives on the American Revolution?”
  • Module 4, Lesson 10, “What adjectives might you use to describe this goddess? Support your answer with evidence from the sculpture.”

2/2

Indicator 1h

Sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks build to a culminating task that integrates skills (may be writing, speaking, or a combination).

Instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectation that they should contain sets of high-quality sequences of text-dependent questions and activities that build to a culminating task that integrates skills to demonstrate understanding. Each module begins with an Essential Question; each module also contains multiple Focusing Questions that deal with the core text. Each of the daily lessons work toward answering the Focusing Questions, while building the skills and knowledge needed to complete the End-of-Module Task. Supplementary texts help to build knowledge while integrating skills such as speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

In Module 1 the Essential Question asks, “What does it mean to have a great heart, literally and figuratively?” The Core Texts in this module include the literary novel, Love That Dog, Sharon Creech and the informational science text, The Circulatory Story, Mary K. Corcoran.

Examples of the Focus Questions to guide students through this module are:
• Lesson 1-6, “How does someone show a great heart, figuratively?”
• Lesson 7-17, “What is a great heart, literally?”
• Lesson 18-29, “How do the characters in Love That Dog show characteristics of great heart?
• Lesson 30-32, “What does it mean to have a great heart, literally and figuratively?”

The End-of-Module Task in this example is in the form of a Socratic Seminar that will "assess their ability to orally synthesize evidence from the texts to answer the Focus Question.” Next, they will have to complete a writing assignment that will synthesize evidence from the texts in the module. Lesson 32, “Write an informative essay that synthesizes evidence from multiple texts in an End-of-Module Task.”

In Module 4 the Essential Question asks, “What can we learn from myths and stories?” The Core Texts in this module include the literary novels, Pushing Up the Sky: Native American Plays for Children, by Joseph Bruchac, Gifts from the Gods: Ancient Words & Wisdom from Greek & Roman Mythology, by Lise Lunge-Larsen, Walk Two Moons, by Sharon Creech, and the Informational text, Understanding Greek Myths, by Natalie Hyde.

Examples of the Focus Questions to guide students through this module are:
•Lesson 1-7, “What are myths, and why do people create them?”
•Lesson 8-14, “What do myths and stories from different cultures have in common?”
•Lesson 15-22, “How are Sal's and Phoebe's stories connected in Walk Two Moons?”
•Lesson 23-31, “What does Sal learn in Walk Two Moons?”
•Lesson 32-35, “What can we learn from myths and stories?”

The End-of-Module Task in this example has students gather effective evidence to support their thinking and demonstrate knowledge of content vocabulary in order to synthesize their learning from material throughout the module texts to “express understanding of what can be learned from myths and stories in an explanatory essay.”

2/2

Indicator 1i

Materials provide frequent opportunities and protocols for evidencebased discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary and syntax. (May be small group and all-class.)

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations providing students frequent opportunities to practice academic vocabulary and syntax in their evidence-based discussions. Each module gives the students ample opportunity to hold evidence-based discussions with Think-Pair-Share, Socratic Seminars, Jigsaw discussions. Gallery Walk/follow-up discussions, etc. The materials offer scaffolds to help students hold academic conversations, including evidence to support students’ claims. Scaffolds include sentence starters, evidence graphic organizers, and teacher-facilitated discussions.

Academic vocabulary instruction is found throughout the modules. Teachers use multiple strategies in introducing, discussing, and using new vocabulary. Each module contains Appendix B, entitled Vocabulary, which clarifies the category in which each word is listed. The materials vocabulary is presented in three categories: Content Vocabulary, Academic Vocabulary, and Text-Critical Vocabulary. Students create vocabulary journals and also participate in Vocabulary Deep Dives and Style and Conventions Deep Dives.

Examples of how students have opportunities for evidence-based discussions that encourage the modeling and use of academic vocabulary include:

Module 1:

  • Lesson 6, “Whole Group - Now that we have added to our definition of great heart, let’s use an Evidence Guide to organize and explain our thinking.”

Module 2:

  • Lesson 2, “Whole Group - Explain to students that Ray Bradbury used the word, consequence, in a different way to mean the importance or significance of something. Display the sentence below from All Summer in a Day to show this different use of the word consequence, and have a student read it aloud.”

Module 3:

  • Lesson 14, “Each student reads one of the following sentences from Detested Tea, by Andrew Matthews and prepares to give either a student-generated definition for the italicized word or a reference-generated definition that is understandable.”
Module 4:
  • Lesson 1, “Encourage students to think about the special meaning of the words they read in the myth about Achilles’ Heel, so that they can explain the story behind the title.”

2/2

Indicator 1j

Materials support students' listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching (including presentation opportunities) with relevant follow-up questions and supports.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations for materials supporting students’ listening and speaking about what they are reading and researching with relevant follow-up questions and evidence.

Speaking and listening work requires students to gather evidence from texts and sources. Opportunities to ask questions and hold discussions with peers and teachers about research, strategies and ideas are present throughout the year.

Within this curriculum there are multiple opportunities for speaking and listening that include whole group discussions and small group discussions. In addition, through the lessons there are instructions for the teacher and tips on facilitating whole group, small group, and partner speaking and listening. Students specifically practice these skills in every module in Socratic Seminars. Materials include speaking and listening rubrics, as well as the Socratic Seminars. There is a tracking form that helps the teacher track students’ ability to perform skills with speaking, listening, and reading (citing evidence).

Module 1, Lesson 9:

  • Using Think-Pair-Share, students are asked to observe closely and explain how the illustrations help the reader understand the hard science, providing details from the book to support their answer.

Module 2, Lesson 31:

  • Students create and present a short skit that shows they understand what Brian learned about survival in the Canadian wilderness.

Module 3, Lesson 8:

  • Students participate in a discussion (Socratic Seminar) about the perspectives of the two main sides of the American Revolution. Students incorporate vocabulary and evidence from the text (including graphic organizers) as evidence to support their opinions.

Module 4, Lesson 33:

  • Students are asked to “think back to our last Socratic Seminar. What did we do best as a class?” Next, “Invite two or three students to share their responses. Have the rest of the class vote with a thumbs up or thumbs down to signal their agreement with their classmates’ reflections.”

2/2

Indicator 1k

Materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing (e.g. multiple drafts, revisions over time) and short, focused projects, incorporating digital resources where appropriate.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations that materials include a mix of on-demand and process writing and short, focused projects. Students write both "on demand" and "over extended periods" throughout every module.

Materials include short and longer writing tasks and projects. Writing tasks and projects are aligned to the grade-level standards being reviewed. Throughout each module students engage in many methods of writing including note-taking, checklists, response journals, graphic organizers, short answer and longer essay construction.

Module 1:

  • In Lesson 6, students use the model along with quotations from Helen Keller, Clara Burton, and Anne Frank to compose a paragraph. During independent writing practice, students will write a paragraph that contains an appropriate topic sentence, key details, and closing sentence.
  • In Lesson 11, students are asked to use an evidence guide to choose evidence and write notes to support the guiding question of, “How does figurative language convey meaning in The Circulatory Story?”

Module 2:

  • In Lesson 3, students are asked to write a descriptive paragraph to give details of a rainy or sunny day in the story All Summer in a Day. Students will use four of their five senses to complete a graphic organizer to describe a setting in the text.
  • In Lesson 24, students are asked to write a paragraph to explain the second supporting point of a focus statement and support the explanation with text evidence.

Module 3:

  • In Lesson 18, students are asked to, “Complete a What, So, So What chart about Maddy. Translate some of the statements from third-person to first-person point of view.”
  • In Lesson 26, the class works together to organize selected quotations into similar groups and to articulate the emerging themes. In the craft section of the lesson, students begin gathering evidence to support an opinion about which character demonstrates American Spirit.

Module 4:

  • In Lesson 10, students are asked to use and evidence guide and choose the best evidence to support a the focus statement, “What do myths from different cultures have in common?” and write notes about the context, provide the evidence, site the source and elaborate on their answer.
  • In Lesson 16, when given a story map students are asked to record the story elements (characters, settings and plot) of Walk Two Moons.

2/2

Indicator 1l

Materials provide opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations for materials providing opportunities for students to address different text types of writing that reflect the distribution required by the standards.

Materials provide frequent opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply writing using evidence. Writing opportunities center around students’ analyses and claims developed from reading closely and working with sources. Materials provide opportunities that build students' writing skills through the use of checklists, models and rubrics. Students are given opportunities for instruction and practice in a variety of genres addressed in the standards over the course of the school year.

Module 1:

  • In the End-of-Module Task, students write an informative essay that synthesizes evidence from multiple literary and informational texts read throughout the module to explain the figurative and literal meanings of the term, Great Heart.
  • In Lesson 3, students write a descriptive paragraph to give details of a rainy or sunny day in the story All Summer in a Day.

Module 2:

  • In Lesson 14, students work toward writing informational paragraphs using the writing techniques learned to make descriptions vivid and engaging.
  • In Lesson 31, students will use this class period to finalize their mountain-survival story narrative. When they finish the final draft and correct all the grammar, usage, and mechanics, they create colored-pencil illustrations to help peers understand the important parts of their narratives.
Module 3:
  • In Lesson 19, students write an informative/explanatory essay to explain Maddy’s perspective on the Revolution and how it influenced her actions in the story, The Scarlet Stocking Spy.
  • The End-of-Module Task has the students write an essay in response to the question: “In your opinion, were the American patriots justified in fighting for their independence from Britain?”

Module 4:

  • In Lesson 13, students are asked to write a well-developed essay, choosing two myths or stories that come from different cultures, and to share a similar theme that will describe each story and compare how they convey the theme.
  • The End-of-Module Task has students write an explanatory essay to express how the lessons from myths and stories teach us about ourselves and our world.

2/2

Indicator 1m

Materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations that materials include frequent opportunities for evidence-based writing to support careful analyses, well-defended claims, and clear information. Materials provide frequent opportunities across the school year for students to learn, practice, and apply writing using evidence. Writing opportunities are focused around student’s analyses and claims developed from reading closely and working with sources. Materials provide opportunities that build students' writing skills over the course of the school year.

The following examples demonstrate evidence-based writing opportunities across all four modules:

Module 1:

  • In Lesson 4, students copy their focus statement into their Evidence Guides and work together to record their evidence about Great Heart in the Evidence Guides. Students use both their sticky notes and the biographies to complete the guide task.
  • In Lesson 26, students use the text, Chalk Talk charts, monthly summaries, and supporting paragraphs to complete a new Evidence Guide task highlighting Miss Stretchberry’s actions and how she is helping Jack grow.

Module 2:

  • In Lesson 9, students arrange themselves into pairs to work with another who would like to write as the same character. Instruct students to write 3–5 thought shots for their selected character or speaker based on specific events or sections of the text.
  • In Lesson 20, students bring their Response Journals with them as they visit and read each chart, recording the evidence they see to answer the question, “How is Brian responding to the challenges of his extreme setting?”

Module 3:

  • In Lesson 4, students begin recording the evidence of different perspectives and resulting actions or conflicts of the two main sides of the American Revolution, in preparation for writing the explanatory essay.
  • In Lesson 18, gather evidence about the historical events in the book, George vs. George to help write an historically accurate essay about Maddy’s perspective and actions in the story.

Module 4:

  • In Lesson 6, students gather evidence and elaborate on it to explain what myths are and why people create them so as to independently write a draft of their paragraph to respond to the focusing question for this learning arc.
  • In Lesson 26, students begin gathering evidence of what Sal learns in Walk Two Moons and then write an essay with paragraph conclusions and a final essay conclusion.

2/2

Indicator 1n

Materials include explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards for grade level as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of context.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet expectations for explicit instruction of the grammar and conventions standards as applied in increasingly sophisticated contexts, with opportunities for application both in and out of the context. Each lesson has a deep dive in either vocabulary or style as well as conventions for 15 minutes of instruction, allowing students to practice the skills throughout the modules. Writing rubrics include grammar and conventions, and there are checklists at the End-of-Module tasks to assess application of conventions listed in the language standards.

Module 1:

  • Lesson 11: Review of rules of capitalization, look for examples of each rule in text, write examples in Style and Conventions journal.
  • Lesson 13: Identify an example of figurative language in The Circulatory Story and explain why the author uses figurative language to describe the blood vessels.
Module 2:
  • Lesson 5: Explain how punctuation is used to help display characters’ personality traits in dialogue.
  • Lesson 6: Add punctuation to help display personality traits in characters in dialogue.

Module 3:

  • Lesson 8: Students peer review with checklist for editing fragments or run-ons, and strengthening complete sentences.
  • Lesson 24: With a partner, students identify the progressive verb in a sentence and then rewrite the sentences in present and future tense.

Module 4:

  • Lesson 12: Improve use of modal auxiliary verbs to convey various conditions.
  • Lesson 20: Recognize and define idioms in context, and explain why idioms are important in speaking and writing.

Criterion 1o-1q

Materials in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language targeted to support foundational reading development are aligned to the standards.

The materials reviewed do not have a formal foundational skills component and instead recommend pairing the materials with a high-quality foundational skills program. With the materials provided, foundational skills are met or partially met in various ways throughout the materials.

1/2

Indicator 1o

Materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills by providing explicit instruction and assessment in phonics and word recognition that demonstrate a research-based progression.

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 partially meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks address grade-level CCSS for foundational skills to build comprehension by providing instruction in phonics, word recognition, morphology, vocabulary, and reading fluency in a research-based and transparent progression. Each module includes instruction, review, and/or practice in the foundational skills of morphology, vocabulary and fluency. Emphasis is placed on students determining new or unknown words and word parts through Greek and Latin roots and affixes. However, there is no review or instruction in the foundational skill area of phonics (letter-sound correspondences and syllabication patterns). Students practice morphology both in and out of context, allowing for students to make connections between acquisition of foundational skills and making meaning from reading. Modeled, echo, whisper, and partner reading throughout the lessons, along with fluency assignments for homework, provide multiple opportunities for students to increase oral and silent fluency across grade level.

Module 1:

  • Lesson 9: Instruct students to Think-Pair-Share, and ask: “When you are reading a piece of text like this, how can you decode the meaning of words such as atrium, mitral valve, and ventricle?” (You can look for context clues, look it up in a reference work, or ask a partner.)

Module 2:

  • Lesson 14: For students who need extra support in speaking clearly or reading at an understandable pace, consider deliberately modeling what that would sound like, or give students additional time for guided performance practice before the next major speaking opportunity (e.g., presentation or reading).
  • Lesson 17: Direct students to dig deeply into the word survival. The word is derived from super “over, beyond” and vivere “to live;” vita means “life.” “How do the roots vivere and super help you understand the word survival?”

Module 3:

  • Lesson 5: Ask students, "What prefix do you see in the word independent? What does this prefix mean?” The word independent has the prefix -in. We have learned that this prefix means “not.” Clarify as needed that independent is an antonym of dependent, and the prefix -in meaning “not” shows this opposite.
  • Lesson 21: For the first night of fluency homework, students should accurately read the passage three to five times.

Module 4:

  • Lesson 1: The teacher explains the meaning of the word invincible using knowledge of word parts and the context clues in the myth of Achilles.
  • Lesson 3: Students discuss what the three prefixes (poly-, mono-, a-) mean. Check for student understanding by asking students if they need further clarification or explanation for any of the prefixes.

2/2

Indicator 1p

Materials, lessons, and questions provide instruction in and practice of word analysis skills in a research-based progression in connected text and tasks.

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria for materials, questions, and tasks guiding students to read with purpose and understanding and to make frequent connections between acquisition of foundation skills and making meaning from reading. The Appendix B: Vocabulary found within the materials states that this curriculum “focuses on teaching and learning words from texts. Students develop an awareness of how words are built, how they function within sentences, and how word choice affects meaning and reveals an author’s purpose.” In the Vocabulary Deep Dives lessons, students learn morphology. The Vocabulary Deep Dives use the anchor and supplemental texts and materials to reinforce connections in order to help the student generalize the skill within the context of what they are learning.

Module 1:

  • Lesson 4: The teacher is to remind students that at the end of the previous lesson they examined the dictionary definitions of greathearted. “Explain that today’s lesson will focus on defining a figurative great heart and extending this definition with evidence from each biography.”
  • Lesson 22: “The purpose of this Deep Dive is to examine the word immortal and to discuss the meaning of the Latin root mort to better understand it in this word and in other words with the same root. Read this line from “The Tiger: ”What immortal hand or eye could frame thy fearful symmetry?”

Module 2:

  • Lesson 13: The teacher reads an excerpt from page 11 of Mountains: “What does the word exposed mean?” Excavate Words: Look at other words with the same root pos and explain to students that they are going to try to excavate, or break apart the word to determine what the root means.
  • Lesson 32: Students practice reading their mountain survival stories with a partner, focusing on fluency. The teacher reminds students to add expression, so the reading is more interesting for listeners.

Module 3:

  • Lesson 21: Reading from Woods Runner by Gary Paulson, students listen for the word frontier and how it’s used in these excerpts. “Jot down the words from these sentences that could be used as context clues to help understand frontier.”
  • Lesson 13: Assign the second night of fluency homework using Handout 12B (The Milliner; relative to the topic of the module). For homework, students read the passage three to five times, focusing on appropriate phrasing and pausing.

Module 4:

  • Lesson 3: Use the root theos and prefixes poly–, a–, and mono– to define content vocabulary from Understanding Greek Myths, by Natalie Hyde.
  • Lesson 13: Tell students that they are going to use the meaning of the Latin root gratia, and what they know about the Gratia from mythology, to understand the meaning of the noun, grace.

2/2

Indicator 1q

Instructional opportunities are frequently built into the materials for students to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, that is, to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.

The materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the criteria for providing students frequent opportunities to practice and achieve reading fluency in oral and silent reading, as well as to read on-level prose and poetry with accuracy, rate appropriate to the text, and expression.

Within the lessons, fluent reading is modeled, and students have ongoing opportunities to engage in partner reading, choral reading, echo reading and repeated reading. There are a variety of resources that include fluency instruction, fluency practice, and student performance checklists for self and peer/adult. Within each module, fluency passages are also assigned as homework for repeated practice over multiple days and include a checklist for self-reflection and listener feedback.

Module 1:

  • Lesson 10: Students practice reading the passage on Handout 8A: Fluency Homework three to five times, recording their practice on the handout.
  • Lesson 12: Teacher models how to fluently read the new Fluency Homework passage. Students read the passage three to five times, focusing on accuracy, and students mark the chart when finished.

Module 2:

  • Over the course of several lessons, students work on fluency skills including clear articulation, pace and volume, appropriate phrasing, accuracy, and expression
  • Lesson 12: Students chorally read the following sentence from Mountains: "Most mountains are not solitary peaks but part of long chains or ranges.”
  • Lesson 14: Students read chorally the following sentence (the last in the text): “Mountains offer a chance for people to climb or ski or just take pleasure from some of the most spectacular scenery in the world.”

Module 3:

  • Lesson 5: Students practice reading with fluency an assigned monologue for four homework assignments in order to later perform it in a choral reading.
  • Lesson 9: Students continue to read aloud their assigned monologue, or section of a monologue, until all those in Colonial Voices have been read. Students are reminded to read with expression and clarity.

Module 4:

  • Lesson 15: Students read the text carefully and annotate to help read fluently. They practice reading the text aloud three to five times and evaluate their progress.
  • Lesson 31: Students read essays to partners; students focus on the same concepts as when practicing their fluency.

Materials provide ample opportunities for students to build knowledge through content-rich, integrated reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language experiences.

Criterion 2a-2h

The series of texts in each collection are cohesive and are related to the anchor texts. All modules develop student’s knowledge through structured learning activities that provide effective scaffolding of content leading to students comprehending texts independently and proficiently.

Students explore the author’s craft and word choices, analyze the text’s structure and its implicit meaning, and attend to other unique features of the text.

All lessons include coherently sequenced sets of text-dependent questions and tasks that require students to analyze the integration of knowledge. Each module has several Focusing Question Tasks that scaffold the material to aid in the successful completing of the End-of-Module task.

Vocabulary is taught both implicitly and explicitly using words in the core and supplementary texts.

Through explicit learning-to-write instruction, teachers gradually release responsibility for a specific writing strategy through a series of lessons. Materials contain a progression of focused research projects to encourage students to develop knowledge in a given area by confronting and analyzing different aspects of a topic using multiple texts and source materials.

The majority of lessons require some independent readings of text followed by text specific questions and tasks that reflect student accountability.

4/4

Indicator 2a

Texts are organized around a topic/topics (or, for grades 6-8, topics and/or themes) to build students' ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently.

The instructional materials for Grade 4 meet the criteria for texts being organized around a topic/topics or themes to build students’ ability to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently. The series of texts in each collection are cohesive and are related to the anchor texts. All modules develop student’s knowledge through structured learning activities that provide effective scaffolding of content leading to students comprehending texts independently and proficiently. Examples include:

  • In Module 2, students study the topic of Extreme Settings. Students examine how people react to extreme environments. Students analyze what makes landscapes like mountains challenging, in order to answer the question: "How do humans survive against the odds?" Students read and discuss multiple texts to answer the questions, “How does the setting affect the characters or speakers in the text? What makes a mountainous environment extreme? How does setting influence character and plot development? How does a challenging setting or physical environment change a person?” Students read a novel, Hatchet, by Gary Paulsen, a short story, All Summer in a Day, by Ray Bradbury. Students also read scientific accounts titled, Mountains, by Seymour Simon and SAS Survival Handbook: The Ultimate Guide to Surviving Anywhere, by John “Lofty” Wiseman. Students then read poems such as Dust of Snow, by Robert Frost and Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening, by Robert Frost. Students examine images of architecture to build knowledge about the module topic.
  • In Module 4, students study the topic of Myth Making. Students read and analyze myths from the ancient Greeks and Romans as well as Native American tribes, to learn the purpose and importance of these stories in their cultures. Students read Walk Two Moons, a beautiful tapestry of stories within stories to reveal a modern-day myth that captures a snapshot of our human experience. Students read to answer: "What can we learn from myths and stories?" Students read and discuss multiple texts to answer questions such as, “What are myths, and why do people create them? What do myths and stories from different cultures have in common? How are Sal’s and Phoebe’s stories connected in Walk Two Moons? and What does Sal learn in Walk Two Moons?” Students read texts such as a novel (literary)Walk Two Moons, by Sharon Creech, A drama (literary) Pushing Up the Sky: Native American Plays for Children, by Joseph Bruchac. Students also engage with a historical account (informational) Understanding Greek Myths, by Natalie Hyde and read multiple myths (literary) in Gifts from the Gods: Ancient Words & Wisdom from Greek & Roman Mythology, by Lise Lunge-Larsen. Students also examine paintings, graphics, sculptures, videos, photographs and read multiple myths and poems to determine what we can learn from myths and stories.

4/4

Indicator 2b

Materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts.

The instructional materials reviewed for Grade 4 meet the expectations that materials contain sets of coherently sequenced questions and tasks that require students to analyze the language, key ideas, details, craft, and structure of individual texts. The Implementation Guide notes: “Craft Questions teach students the elements of strong craft—writing, speaking, and listening—so that students become adept at applying these skills for a variety of purposes. Students explore the author’s craft and word choices, analyze the text’s structure and its implicit meaning, and attend to other unique features of the text. Students begin by examining high-quality exemplars of the craft. Then they receive progressive direct instruction in the skills necessary to practice and master the craft. Annotation during the first read aims to develop the habit of monitoring understanding of a text as students read. In subsequent reads, annotation focuses readers on deeper understanding, such as distinguishing among purpose, claim, and conclusion, noticing authors’ crafting of literary elements or text features, and/or supporting learning goals relevant to the text (e.g., character analysis, influence of setting).”

Examples include:

Module 1:

  • In Lesson 12, groups work for five minutes to determine the two most important details about blood vessels and write them in their pages.

Enhancements

Additional Tools

Additional Tools to be Used with Houghton Mifflin 2003

  • Houghton Mifflin Sound Spelling Cards
  • Sound/Spellings Taught on Houghton Mifflin Sound Spelling Cards
  • Sound Spelling Card: ng
  • Greek and Latin Roots for Students
  • Prefixes and Suffixes example
  • Jabberwocky and Syllable Game
  • Sorting Syllables Game and Answer Key
  • Advanced Syllable Sort
  • Types of Multisyllabic Words
  • Specific Word Instruction
  • Be a Word Expert
  • Small Group Decodable Text Reading Routine
  • Template Reference
  • Teaching Strategy Instruction Quiz (Card 15)

Flip charts

Houghton Mifflin (2003)


Houghton Mifflin (2005)


Additional Tools to be used with Horizons

  • Supplemental Stories for Horizons A, B, & A/B
      • Supplemental stories cover letter
      • Supplemental stories for Horizons A, lessons 46 - 99
      • Supplemental stories for Horizons A, lessons 100 - 140
      • Supplemental stories for Horizons A, lessons 141 - 155
      • Supplemental stories for Horizons B, lessons 5 - 150
  • Horizons A Fluency Passages
  • Horizons A sound practice
  • Horizons A (and A/B) word practice
  • Horizons B Fluency Passages
  • Horizons B sound practice
  • Horizons B (and A/B) word practice
  • Horizons C/D word practice
  • Horizons C/D Fact Reviews
      • Fact Reviews Description
   Answer Keys
      • Lesson 10 Answer Key
      • Lesson 20 Answer Key
      • Lesson 30 Answer Key
      • Lesson 40 Answer Key
      • Lesson 50 Answer Key
   Student Materials
      • Lesson 10 Fact Review
      • Lesson 20 Fact Review
      • Lesson 30 Fact Review
      • Lesson 40 Fact Review
      • Lesson 50 Fact Review
  • Bingo Cards:

 

Additional Tools to be used with Phonics for Reading

  • Phonics for Reading Implementation Tips presentation
  • STAR Rules
  • Phonics for Reading Lesson Notes
  • Helpful Hints for Implementing Phonics for Reading
  • Coaching Tips
  • Placement Test Cheat Sheet
  • Placement Test Summary Spreadsheet
  • Rapid Reads (Teacher Record form)
  • Rapid Reads (Student forms)
  • Check-Up Forms (Levels 1-3)
  • Check-Up Summary Spreadsheet (Levels 1-3)
  • Word Reading Practice Strategies
  • 5 x 5 Fluency Procedures
  • Progress Monitoring Procedures
  • Passage Reading Practice Strategies
  • Oral Reading Fluency Strategies
  • Word Sneak Peeks Template

Level 1 Materials

 

  

  • Observation Form (Level 1)
  • Sound Drills (Lessons 1-30)
  • 5x5 Drills for Irregular & High Frequency Words (Level 1)
  • Review Words (Level 1)
  • Progress Chart (Level 1)
  • Check Up Form (Level 1)
Word Dashes (for new words)
  • Word Dash: Lessons 1-6
  • Word Dash: Lessons 7-12
  • Word Dash: Lessons 13-18
  • Word Dash: Lessons 19- 24
  • Word Dash: Lessons 25-30
Progress Monitoring
  • Progress Monitoring Overview
  • Progress Monitoring: Lessons 11-16
  • Progress Monitoring: Lesson 17-23
  • Progress Monitoring: Lessons 24-28
  • Progress Monitoring: Lessons 29-30
  • Progress Monitoring Review Words
  • Progress Monitoring Word Lists
  • Progress Monitoring Summary Spreadsheet
  • Progress Monitoring Graphs

Level 2 Materials

 

 

  • Observation Form (Level 2)
  • Sound Drills (Lessons 1-32)
  • Word Reading (Lessons 1-32)
  • 5x5 Drills for Irregular & High Frequency Words (Lessons 1-32)
  • Review Words (Lessons 1-32)
  • Homework (Lessons 1-32)
  • Progress Chart (Level 2)
  • Check Up Form (Level 2)
Word Dashes (for new words)
  • Word Dash: Lessons 1-6
  • Word Dash: Lessons 7-12
  • Word Dash: Lessons 13-18
  • Word Dash: Lessons 19-23
  • Word Dash: Lessons 24-28
  • Word Dash: Lessons 29-32
Progress Monitoring
  • Progress Monitoring Overview
  • Progress Monitoring: Lessons 1-6
  • Progress Monitoring: Lesson 7-12
  • Progress Monitoring: Lessons 13-17
  • Progress Monitoring: Lessons 18-20
  • Progress Monitoring: Lessons 21-26
  • Progress Monitoring: Lessons 27-32
  • Progress Monitoring Word Lists(Level 2)
  • Progress Monitoring Summary Spreadsheet (Level 2)
  • Progress Monitoring Graphs

Level 3

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